Be breast aware

Find out how to proactively manage your breast health at any age

Brought to you by Hologic, Inc.


More than half of all breast cancers are found by a woman or her doctor after noticing a change in the breast.1 Early detection is vital – when breast cancer is detected early, the 5-year survival rate is 97%.2


Get proactive

So which detection methods are right for you?
Below are the initial steps to breast cancer detection to help you determine – in consultation with your doctor – the best methods for your personal situation.

Watch Tracey Spicer’s detection journey.

#letstalkaboutbreasts

@TraceySpicer



Physical examination

All women, beginning in their 20s, should be aware of breast self-examination and have regular clinical breast exams.1,3….
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Breast screening

Most major screening programs target women from the age of 50 for free 2-yearly screening mammograms….
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Diagnostic mammography

Diagnostic mammography is typically performed at private clinics and hospitals for high risk women. Scroll down to learn more and find out if you are high risk….
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Self-exams: All women, beginning in their 20s, should be aware of breast self-examination.3 Become familiar with the normal look and feel of your breasts, and check the whole area – from your armpits to your collarbone.

Try to be aware of any changes that are different and report these to your doctor immediately.3,4 Look out for things such as a lump, a change in your breast size or shape, any nipple changes, a change to your skin such as redness or dimpling, or any persisting pain.5


Clinical exams: Most women, from their 20s and 30s, should have regular clinical breast exams by a medical professional.6 This usually involves a thorough physical examination of your breasts. You will also be asked about your personal and family history and whether you have any symptoms.7

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Most major screening programs target women from the age of 50 for free 2-yearly screening mammograms. Organised screening programs aim to detect cases of unsuspected breast cancer in well women or those without symptoms of breast disease.

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Diagnostic mammography is typically performed at private clinics and hospitals for high risk women. Your doctor will refer you following a consultation. Learn more

Talk to your doctor about your risk. You may have a higher risk if you:8,9

  • Notice any breast changes or lumps.
  • Have a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer.
  • Have dense breasts, e.g. women in their 40s not targeted by breast screening programs.
  • Have had a previous diagnosis of breast disease.
  • Require further assessment following an inconclusive screening exam.
There may be a need for further testing, such as an ultrasound, MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) or biopsy.7 Learn more.

One of the latest methods for diagnostic testing is the 3D MAMMOGRAPHY™ exam.



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Watch Tracey Spicer’s detection journey.

#letstalkaboutbreasts

@TraceySpicer

Tracey Spicer is one of the most respected news presenters and journalists in Australia.





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Brought to you by Hologic, Inc.